Snowblower

Snowblower Parts and Resources

Snowblower Parts and Resources

Snowblower Model Number Finder

The best way to locate the correct part for the type and brand of your snowblower, is to find the correct model number on your machine.
If you are unsure how to find the model number on your snow blower, here is a suggestion on where to look.

Where is my Snowblower Model Number?

Where is my Snowblower Model Number?

 

  • On the rear of your snowblower
  • On the side of your snowblower

 

 

 

 

Most Commonly Replaced Snow blower Parts

Shear Bolt and Nut -for most types and brands of snowblowers

Shear Bolt and Nut

Shear Bolt and Nut

Snowblower Discharge Chute – discharge chute assembly

Snowblower Discharge Chute

Snowblower Discharge Chute

Snowblower Auger Blade – Rubber, Impeller half-Requires 2 for complete assembly

Snow blower Auger Blade

Snow blower Auger Blade

Snowblower V-Belt – for most brands and types

Snow blower V-Belt

Snow blower V-Belt

Snowblower Scraper Blade – See recommended related parts for attaching hardware

Snow blower Scraper Blade

Snow blower Scraper Blade

More Snowblower Parts

 

Types of Snowblowers

There are three different types of snowboarders. One should suit every customer’s needs.

Single-stage electric snow blower or snow thrower

  • Smaller in size, no driven wheels
  • Rubber-tipped auger picks up snow and throws it, also helps propel machine
  • Best for short, level driveways, decks, and walkways
  • Handles snow levels no higher than four inches
  • Usually the size of a walk-behind mower
  • Single-stage electric snow blowers and snow throwers are lightest, smallest, quietest, and easiest to handle
  • No need for gas and engine maintenance
  • Rubber-edged auger can pick up and throw gravel, not a good choice for gravel driveways
  • Narrow, 11- to 18-inch swaths usually mean clearing requires multiple passes
  • Modest pulling power difficult on steep slopes
  • Might pull sideways
  • Power cord limits range and maneuverability

Single-stage gas snowblower or snowthrower

  • Small to midsized models, typically more powerful than electric versions
  • Works well on level, midsized paved driveways and walkways
  • Handles snow levels no higher than eight inches
  • Light, easy to handle
  • Takes as much storage space as a mower
  • Freedom from a cord
  • Clears a 20- to 22-inch swath
  • Offers electric starting
  • Poor choice for gravel driveways
  • Modest pulling power
  • Can pull sideways on steep slopes
  • Gas engines are often two-cycle (need oil to mix with the gasoline)
  • Requires regular maintenance

Two-stage gas snowblowers and snowthrowers

  • Auger picks up and throws snow
  • Two stage gas snowblowers add a fan-like impeller above the auger to help throw snow out the chute
  • Propelled by engine-driven wheels
  • Larger, more powerful models
  • Best for long, wide driveways
  • Handles snow levels higher than eight inches
  • Clears a swath 28- to 30-inches wide
  • Driven wheels can handle steeper inclines
  • Two-stage snow blowers are a must on gravel, since the auger doesn’t touch the ground
  • Heavy and expensive
  • Take up as much storage space as a lawn tractor
  • Gas engine requires regular maintenance
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